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Vincent

Vincent manages to be a very sweet film that goes down like a savoury treat; simple, easily consumable and ultimately satisfying.
Vincent

 Image: sff.org,au

Writer and director Thomas Salvador also stars in this film as the unassuming protagonist, Vincent - a quiet, friendly sort of guy who works construction during the day, spends time with his friends and enjoys partying at music festivals. There’s a twist, obviously; our Vincent gets superhuman powers whenever he touches water.

Jumping into rivers fully clothed, driving his bike of a ledge to fall into a lake, drifting in an estuary filled with sewer water – there’s nothing Vincent won’t do to glide faster than a dolphin or literally break down walls with his dripping hands. He meets Lucie (Vimala Pons) and together they begin to explore his talents, only to be chased by befuddled police.

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A low-key superhero film of sorts, there’s a simple pleasure in watching a gifted everyman exercise his skills without the obligatory fire-and-brimstone destroyed-city conclusion typical of higher budget fanfare. Watching Vincent desperately search for any water source to evade his pursuers is frequently delightful, as is watching their shocked faces as he outstrips their boat or uses his strength to climb bridges and towers.

A light, gutsy and charming comedy primed for a US remake, despite it’s low-budget and smaller set-pieces, Vincent has many of the hallmarks of the now heavily-inundated superhero genre, including an obligatory and entertaining escape sequence. Challenging Rainn Wilson’s Super for most down-to-earth superhero movie, Vincent doesn’t really bother fighting for the greater good or recruiting an army of super-skilled warriors to take on organized crime, he’s just an extra-ordinary guy trying to get on with his lot, get the girl and go for a swim.

Original, yet not ground-breaking by any means and at times overly self-indulgent, Vincent is nevertheless an entertaining little feat. With a short run-time of 78 minutes,Vincent manages to be a very sweet film that goes down like a savoury treat; simple, easily consumable and ultimately satisfying.  

A contender for the Festival prize, Vincent is currently screening at the Sydney Film Festival

Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5

Vincent
Director: Thomas Salvadore
France, 2014, 78 mins

Sydney Film Festival
www.sff.org.au
3-14 June

Glen Falkenstein

Tuesday 9 June, 2015

About the author

Glen produces film, theatre and television reviews and commentary, covering festivals, interviews and events. Glen lives in Sydney and enjoys making short films. Read more at falkenscreen.com